Funded Projects 


SAMHSA funded Trauma Treatment Program

Children’s Research Triangle’s (CRT) Trauma Treatment Program (TTP) is an assessment-driven, trauma informed intervention program based in Chicago, Illinois. Funded since 2009 as a Community Treatment and Service Center for the National Child Traumatic Stress Network, the TTP makes trauma-informed therapeutic services available to children and adolescents ages 0 to 18 by providing and evaluating evidenced-based interventions, and educating professionals, caretakers, and other community members about the impact of trauma on youth. The TTP is an expansion of the existing program at CRT, thereby increasing the number of children served in the community. The TTP follows a comprehensive screening, assessment, and treatment process, which includes foundational material from the NCTSN's 2012 Breakthrough Series Collaborative, Improving Comprehensive Assessments and Case Formulations by Implementing the NCTSN Core Curriculum. As part of the TTP, all children and adolescents referred to CRT for services undergo an initial screening for trauma exposure. Children identified as having a history of trauma are referred for an assessment designed to obtain more information about the child’s trauma history, behavioral presentation, and trauma-related symptomatology. A high standard of care will be ensured by ongoing training, consultation, and reflective supervision for TTP staff and partner site  The TTP works in multiple under-resourced community settings, requiring the use of a variety of treatment interventions to best meet the needs of the clients served. Consequently, the TTP employs several Evidence-Based Practices, including Child-Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), and Structured Psychotherapy for Adolescents Responding to Chronic Stress (SPARCS). During each of the five years of funding, 400 children and adolescents will be screened for traumatic histories; 225 will undergo a systematic trauma assessment; 60 will participate in TTP trauma-focused interventions; 60 will participate in Youth Trauma Workshops; one partner agency will receive intensive consultation services; 100 community members will receive training about the mental health impact of childhood trauma, and 50 community members will receive training on prevention/mental health promotion topics related to childhood trauma. Taking into account overlap in screening, assessment, and treatment, CRT will provide direct services to a minimum of 3,050 individuals over the five years. We are pleased that this grant has also allowed us to expand services to military families in the Chicagoland area.

PROJECT TEAM:

Project Director
Linda Schwartz, Ph.D.

Project Coordinator
Julianna Wesolowski, LCPC

Project Evaluator
Anne Wells, Ph.D.

Training Coordinator
Samantha Orbach, Psy.D.


SAMHSA funded Youth Mental Health First Aid Training Grant

For this project, CRT will provide Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) training to organizations serving high-risk youth located in the Chicago Metropolitan area in predominantly low-income, minority communities facing disparities in mental health identification and treatment.  The target training population for the project works in a range of fields that have frequent contact with youth who are at significant risk of developing mental health disorders, including child protective agencies, faith-based organizations, gang violence prevention groups, youth mentoring agencies, family support/teen parenting programs, schools and educational institutions, domestic violence shelters, juvenile and family court, medical providers, and military-serving organizations.  The high-risk youth served by these agencies include youth exposed to community violence; youth from homes with domestic violence; youth who have experienced child maltreatment; youth in foster care; children of military service members; and youth who have experienced prenatal substance exposure. Many youth fall into several of these risk categories simultaneously, and interface with multiple professionals and paraprofessionals. The youth in these high-risk groups have well-documented, heightened rates of serious mental health disorders and emotional disturbance. The overarching purpose of this project is to increase both the identification of mental health disorders and the referral of high-risk youth to appropriate services throughout the Chicago Metropolitan area.  This project will provide valuable training to participants on recognizing the symptoms of common mental illnesses and substance use disorders, strategies to de-escalate crisis situations safely, and how to initiate timely referrals to mental health and substance abuse resources available in the community. This information is vital for the many front-line disciplines that interact with youth exhibiting untreated mental health disorders and crises on a daily basis.

PROJECT TEAM:

Co-Project Directors
Linda Schwartz, Ph.D.
Samantha Orbach, Psy.D.

YMHFA Trainers
Wendy Kovacs, Ph.D., LMFT
Anne Gamache, LCPC, CADC
Erin Telford, Psy.D.

Outreach Coordinator
Julianna Wesolowski, LCPC

Project Evaluator
Anne Wells, Ph.D.


SAMHSA funded Project LAUNCH-Illinois Southland

Project LAUNCH-Illinois Southland (PL-IS) is a collaboration between Children’s Research Triangle (CRT) and the Partnership for Resilience (PfR) to promote the wellness of young children by enhancing and expanding available services in Chicago’s Southland. PL-IS will work with children ages 0-8 and their parents from Chicago’s Southland, the suburban region directly south and southwest of Chicago. PL-IS emerges from the existing work of the PfR, which is a collaboration of 42 schools in nine Southland school districts. The shared goals of integrating health, mental health, and education systems through the creation of sustainable community partnerships, education and training programs, and trauma-informed early childhood mental health practices guides PL-IS. PL-IS will expand the existing partnership formed by PfR to develop a formal Young Child Wellness Council (YCWC). The YCWC’s purpose is to identify community needs as they align with project goals/objectives and to develop and implement a strategic plan to meet program goals. PL-IS will address the following:

·       systems development to support a community infrastructure capable of meeting the vast needs of the Southland to promote the health and well-being of young children and their families;

·       routine screening for developmental, medical, social-emotional issues, and trauma exposure, and accessible assessment for these issues;

·       behavioral health integration with primary care because primary care providers maintain ongoing contact with families and are in an ideal position to identify risks and make referrals, improving outcomes;

·       early childhood mental health consultation, which is critical to helping educational and early care settings understand the needs of young children and their families;

·       family strengthening and training in which the goal will be to work with existing agencies to determine strategies to increase capacity to serve young children and parents;

·       promotion and public awareness by developing a comprehensive campaign that targets the general public and community agencies.

PROJECT TEAM:

Project Director
Erin Telford, Psy.D.

Southland Initiative Project Coordinator
Donzell Franklin, MA

Project Evaluator
Anne Wells, Ph.D.

Screening, Assessment, Referral Coordinator
Emily Odiase, MSW

Family Navigator Specialist
Nekika Skinner, BS

Therapist/Mental Health Consultant
Rose Mesick, LCPC

Early Childhood Mental Health Consultant
Karen Parker

Evaluation Administrator
Ajla Hodzic, BA


SAMHSA funded Early Mental Health Program

The Early Mental Health Program (EMHP) is a multicomponent treatment program providing comprehensive services to children ages 0-12 with, and at risk for, significant mental health challenges. The program expands upon CRT’s existing services, and provides wrap-around services including screening, psychological evaluation, therapy, parent and community training, and consultation. Services are offered both at CRT’s downtown clinic and at our community partner sites around the Chicago Metropolitan Area. All children ages 0 to 12 and their families who come to CRT undergo an initial screening to identify risk factors for mental health challenges. Those identified as at-risk for or having mental health challenges are referred to psychological evaluation and/or therapy services with CRT clinicians. Therapy services at the EMHP will include Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC), Parent Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), Child Parent Psychotherapy (CPP), Parents and Children Together (PACT) and Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT). Prevention is another critical component to decreasing risk factors associated with significant mental health challenges To this end, the EMHP offers Systematic Training for Effective Parenting (STEP) at community sites for parents of children ages 0 to 12. Additionally, community professionals who work with children will receive training on diagnostic and treatment issues related to significant mental health challenges, and community agencies will receive ongoing early childhood consultation services from program staff. Funded by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, CRT looks forward to serving at least 2,970 people through the EMHP over the next five years.

PROJECT TEAM:

Project Director
Julianna Wesolowski, LCPC

Project Evaluator
Anne M. Wells, PhD

Physician
Tina Nguyen, MD

Therapists
Monica Dirr, LCSW
Lorie Enlow, LMFT
Venezah St. Louis, MSW

Psychologist
Stephanie Kohlman, PsyD

Case Manager
Emily Odiase, MSW

Training Director
Samantha Orbach, PsyD

Research Assistant
Devanshi Shah, MPH